Category Archives: Halloween

Autumn is Coming!

It’s September. The fall season is just a few weeks away … and my husband and I have already pulled out all of our Halloween decorations and started putting them up! As much as I love this season, I can’t help but feel sad looking at the closed swimming pool! I ran into the guy who runs it the other day and tried to convince him to keep it open just one more week! Hey, with these 90 degree temps, it makes sense, right?

The Fall Equinox this year is on Tuesday, September 23. Following our annual family beach week earlier in the month, I plan to get started on my personal fall checklist (which is mostly separate from my Halloween checklist)!

*Continue taking after-dinner walks
*Make crock-pot meals for dinner
*Jump into a big pile of fall leaves
*Carve pumpkins
*Incorporate pumpkin and butternut squash into at least two dinner recipes
*Take a drive to see the fall leaves (already have a Shenandoah getaway booked!)
*Walk through a corn maze
*Drink a pumpkin spice latte (but just one … too many calories etc. in that sucker)
*Finish editing the story I’ve been toiling over for two years, already!
*Go on a hayride
*Make some tasty hot toddies
*Spend more nights curled up with a blanket and a good book and/or movie

Before I get started on any of this, I’m going to the beach!

What’s on your autumn checklist?

Howl-o-Scream 2011 at Busch Gardens Williamsburg

Eric and I just love Halloween and have grown to think of it as “our” holiday. We love the spooky ambiance, the tasty candy, the fun events, the dramatic organ music punctuated with Boris Karloff laughs. Unfortunately this year we were both so busy a good deal of the time that we didn’t get to do a lot of that stuff this ‘go round. So I decided we had to have our actual Halloween weekend be the most awesome one possible. Almost immediately, I thought of the famous Howl-o-Scream event at Busch Gardens Williamsburg. Continue reading

A Three-Day Halloween

I don’t go to church that much anymore, but I am still very fond of the Episcopal church. I wasn’t fond dragging myself out of my warm bed to go sit through a long, long sermon and our typically dry and sleep-inducing hymns, but I enjoyed singing in five or six different Episcopal choirs (I believe I was in five at one time), and I loved doing other church activities. Some of my favorite memories are of my time spent away at our mountain retreat, Shrine Mont, in Orkney Springs, at the biannual youth retreats in Culpeper we called Voices, and the three summers I spent at Shrine Mont’s summer art camp. I made some great friends, many of whom I’m still in touch with today, and I often credit Voices with developing some of my leadership skills (as I designed and lead one of the weekends myself around 1 Corinthians 13), and art camp with encouraging me to be more confident and to make friends more easily.

One of the things our own church did every year was put on a huge Halloween party – okay, huge by small town standards. I could not wait till we dragged out the big black wooden coffin and the gravestone-shaped sign every year, and figured out what rooms we would put on the haunted house tour. One year I was an insane screaming girl in an asylum, and another year I was some hapless chick who got thrown into a cauldron full of fog. Before the party, we would gather near the entrance to the graveyard as a lay reader conducted a small service to remember the dead. We Episcopalians took our Halloween very seriously, and not in the “Hell House” sense.

Episcopalians have three special days centered around remembering the dead; the collective term is Hallowmas. All Hallows Eve is simply the night before All Saints Day and representative of a mostly secular celebration prior to two days of remembrance and prayer. Interestingly enough, history teaches that Roman Catholics took over this holiday from the pagans and moved it to November 1, but even so, we always made a special event out of Halloween/All Hallows. All Saints Day is the time to remember the saints, often learning stories about them in Sunday school, and All Souls Day is reserved to honor all of the departed. Now, how common the complete Hallowmas celebration is, I’m not sure, but all the same … Happy All Souls to us all, and may you remember everyone you love with joy.

Reach Out and Touch a Ghost

The Virginia Scientific Research Association (VSRA) leads ghost tours around historic downtown Leesburg, which is the county seat of beautiful Loudoun County, Virginia. The VSRA was founded in 1992 by Joe Holbert. According to this article from the Washington Post, Holbert, then the director of the Loudon Museum, began investigating paranormal sightings in Leesburg after the mayor requested that he put together a ghost tour. Soliciting local residents for stories, he was surprised by the volume of submissions he received. Holbert and his team were able to debunk all but 42 of the stories. Today the VSRA shares some of those stories on walking tours held from May through October.

I went on one of these tours with my sister and her husband this month. Our tour guide did a great job sharing stories about the houses and places of business we passed. We were touring at the same time as a much larger group ahead of us, so we often had to wait for that group to finish looking at sites just ahead before we could move on. A wedding being held at one of the sites held us up for quite some time; in fact, I think it’s possible the average tour time is closer to an hour and a half.

This tour is fairly well-known in this area for two different reasons. The first is that it is not lead just by history buffs telling ghost tales, but by the VSRA’s team of paranormal researchers. Many have had experience investigating the sites visited, and they share their personal knowledge and beliefs regarding the supernatural. Our tour guide explained that there are two main types of ghosts. Sentients are intelligent spirits retaining a human appearance; contrary to popular thought, researchers believe that sentients appear in the areas where they were happiest when they were alive, not because they died there or wish to avenge some wrong done to them. Residuals are perhaps best described as memories left behind by living beings, which can be picked up by some individuals. Examples of residuals in the Leesburg area are the sound of footsteps overhead in one building, a sudden feeling of sadness at a memorial site, the repeated sound of a crash over and over where nothing has fallen, and the strong smell of a woman’s perfume. (Imagine how surprised I was to hear about that last one at a site where, just minutes before, I noticed the smell of perfume and starting sniffing around trying to figure out who was wearing it.) Some residuals take human form but are merely visual memories (as opposed to sentients, which display awareness of their surroundings). Both residuals and sentients emit natural (DC as opposed to AC) electromagnetic frequencies (EMF), as do living things. Persons believed to be most sensitive to residuals are those who are more “right-brained” and those who have higher levels of EMF than the average bear. Our tour guide brought along an EMF reader which she whipped out as we toured a cemetery where stones (and an original part of the floor) mark the foundation of the church that once stood there. She invited us each to walk several times past the EMF reader, which she held still for the best reading. Mine was high at 100, my brother-in-law’s even higher at nearly 150, and one man caused the reader to spike past 1000, but most of the rest of the group had “normal” readings (causing disappointment in some!). The tour guide shared with us that one guest with a particularly high EMF reading once accidentally ignited a candle inside a tavern on the tour by simply looking through the window and joking she could make it light. The tavern owner had to be called at home to come unlock the tavern and put out the flame. My sister tried to get me to pull the same trick at the end of the tour! (Nice try, Cat ;))

The second reason for the tour’s popularity is its unusual ending: guests are invited to “touch a ghost” that is said to haunt one of the two old hanging trees right outside of the looming courthouse. The two trees still bear the faint impression of rings on their thick lower branches from where nooses were once tied. My sister pointed them out to me on the first tree as we stood under it; they are obvious once one knows what to look for. Seeing that tree made me feel saddened for what happened there and sent the expected shiver up my spine. But I wasn’t scared at any point of the tour until we approached the second former hanging tree. Here the tour guide explained that a residual can be felt around, and close to, one of the hanging branches. You’re supposed to get a slightly cooling, tingling sensation. But I mainly felt … awful, like I wasn’t supposed to be anywhere near the tree. I’m just going to leave it at that, but quite honestly, I haven’t felt that terrible about any one place in a long time. No one else seemed to feel this, so I guess I am crazy. The only thing the others noticed was the residual; those of us who said they could feel it noticed slightly cooler sensations and tingling around their hands. I was very thankful to leave the courthouse yard. It was odd to feel that way when I had previously been so excited to see what the whole “touch a ghost” bit was all about!

What I really enjoyed about the tour was how the ghost stories were mixed with bits of historical intrigue about the buildings of Leesburg. For example, we learned that many of the tiny doors and windows we saw were installed that way on purpose because it meant lower property taxes for the owners. A door at a building now housing a Chinese restaurant couldn’t have been much more than a foot across. Can you imagine trying to carry two armfuls of groceries through a door like that? Another building once housed three-time Presidential candidate Henry Clay in the 1800s, and many years later the owners discovered a spot on the wall where he’d written a declaration that the President (himself – guess he thought the third time would be the charm) once slept there. Today his writing is still in its original spot and framed for posterity.

I was also charmed by the general character of Leesburg. Prior to the tour, we had soup and sandwiches at Shoes Cup and Cork Club, so named because it was once the site of a shoe repair business; the original neon sign still glows above the front door. The beautifully designed golden lion’s face on the outside of well-regarded Lightfoot restaurant was quite striking, gleaming regally in the accentuating building lights. Lightfoot resides in the former Peoples National Bank site at 11 King Street. (The bank vault door is still present in the men’s room!) On the same street, right across from the courthouse, are two neighboring businesses: Freedom Bail Bonds, and a biker bar whose neon sign proclaims: “Better Here Than Across the Street”! As the enthusiastic songs of a country band drifted over to us standing under the big hanging tree, I thought to myself that the slogan was true in more ways than one.

Read more about VSRA and the ghost tours here. Happy Halloween!

Coming soon … the Rally to Restore Sanity/March to Keep Fear Alive, a brief stay in Luxembourg, the start of National Novel Writing Month, and I tackle the first of the 30 things!

The Halloween Countdown: Decorating Our Home

October means it’s time to get out the Halloween decorations! Or, in our case, September means it’s time to get out the Halloween decorations. (We get enthusiastic early.) Eric is very blessed in the creativity department, so on one of his rare non-exhausted days off, he began catching up on long overdue artwork. When evening came, he took a break from his Wacom electronic sketch pad to mess around with some old props given to him by his last employer, Joe Devers of Just Outrageous Events, Inc. (JOE). (See the website for this incredibly creative and experienced floral event/event drapery company here: Just Outrageous Events.) Here’s what Eric came up with in no time flat:

Eric's shrine to Halloween

The images on the ceiling and wall are homemade creations Eric set up himself. At the bottom, Eric used a tiki vase from JOE as the base. He cut out pumpkin and ghost stencils from orange construction paper and made them stand up from the base with tape and pieces of bent clothes hanger. At the back, he attached a little flashlight of mine so that it shone through the stencils, projecting the images on the wall.

A flashlight taped behind a couple of homemade stencils makes these cool images on the wall.

An adjustable projector light from JOE shines on the walls, ceiling, or anywhere else we want it to go. (Warning: these types of lights get very hot very fast.) Eric cut out a mean jack-o-lantern face from red paper and pasted it over the light, then pointed it straight up at the ceiling.

RAWWWR

In the middle of the display is an old-style haunted house decoration, one of a few I bought in a pack from our local Giant a year ago. The lights on the surrounding strings are shaped like skulls and jack-o-lanterns.

These Halloween jack-o-lantern lights are from Target.

We hung a “Happy Hauntings” sign from CVS on the outside of our door, and added a re-usable grocery/trick-or-treat bag on the inside.

Trick-or-treat bag from Giant supermarket.

One of my favorite decorations is the “Coffin Mister” I bought a couple of years ago. The coffin’s lid is hinged, and a skeleton sculpture creeps out at you. Fill lines carved inside direct the amount of water needed; flipping the switch activates the fogger and color-changing lights (included in the set). With all other lights off, the sight of the mist pouring out around the skeleton’s expression is very spooky. The Mister comes with a small circle mat to place under it, which does a shoddy job of protecting your fine mahogany, so be forewarned. We place ours on an old coffee table someone threw out at my building that I don’t really give a rip about, and routinely find puddles of water gathered way past the “protective” mat’s borders, and under it too! Also, if you have young children, be aware that the Mister was made with lead paint.

Check your local Target for this coffin mister.

A more child-friendly decoration is this light-up ghost from the Avon catalog! I doubt this particular decoration is still available, but you can find many like him. He turns on and off with a switch and has lasted seven years so far (probably because I take the batteries out before storing each year).

Glowing Ghost, Avon catalog, circa October 2003.

This jack-o-lantern, also provided by Just Outrageous Events, lights up when plugged in. Our cat Domino just loves this guy and lays right in front of his face whenever we turn him on. I’m guessing his lights feel warm on her fur.

Another great Halloween prop from Just Outrageous Events!

Check your local supermarket for Halloween-themed tissues, paper towels, and foaming hand soap.

Softsoap Halloween foaming soap with a glow-in-the-dark label!

Target takes a good portion of cash from me each year with their line of scary socks, throw blankets, pillows, dishware, and stuffed animals.

Just a few of the themed pillows on the couch, all purchased from Target.

Ebay is always a good place to search for unique treasures.

Vintage Garfield Halloween mug, circa late 1980s, purchased from an Ebay seller.

Sumo patiently tolerates dressing as Count Fatula each Halloween with a small doggie costume I bought him. This year, Eric made him a matching vampire coffin for him to sleep in. Eric used cardboard boxes to make the shape and then wrapped them with a black plastic garbage bag. A bit of organic catnip sprinkled inside enticed the vampire kitty to take a closer look. Unfortunately, he was still too wired for pictures and wouldn’t hold still long enough for me to take a good shot!

Count Fatula checks out his new sleeping box.

A bit too small? No worries for this cat. He will cram himself into anything. (Domino's spots can be seen on the left)

We have plenty of other Halloween decorations, including scented candles, vintage postcards, and picture frames, and a flashing pumpkin flashlight. And this year, we’re making Sumo a mummy outfit!

The Halloween Countdown: Spooky Movies

Eric and I always watch lots of Halloween specials and scary movies to help celebrate the season. I have my favorites, and Eric grew up watching monster movie specials on television. Combined with Netflix, we’re left with no shortage of things to watch. But some of our choices have been better than others. Here is a small sampling.

It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown: Come on, it’s a classic. You can’t watch Halloween specials without watching this. As an adult I find myself picking out all kinds of things in this Peanuts special that I’m sure I didn’t notice when I was younger. For example, when Linus takes one bite of his apple in the opening sequence, only to then toss it right into a trashcan, I thought, “How wasteful!” How … grown-up of me, tee hee. But some things don’t change. I still think Violet’s mean girl laugh at Linus as he waits in the pumpkin patch is hysterical, and I still find the extended sequence of Snoopy flying around as the Red Baron the perfect time to get up and make some popcorn – as long as I can make it back in time to see him creep across the deserted country after he crash-lands, because that part’s cool.

Garfield’s Halloween Adventure: Originally titled Garfield in Disguise. This classic is rarely played anymore, which I think is bunk. Come on, it’s awesome. It used to air right after the Peanuts special and I loved watching them back-to-back. Now you’re reduced to watching the Peanuts special with parts of it cut out for times sake while those stupid pop-up ads appear in the bottom of your screen. (I HATE those.) Anyway, this special is not-to-be-missed. Garfield the cat enlists Odie to help him trick-or-treat so that he can have double the candy, but then they wind up fending off a band of pirate ghosts. It’s highly amusing and the songs are gold. I will never tire of this one.

Hell House: This documentary by George Ratliff shows us the inside of a Dallas megachurch that puts on a giant evangelical “haunted house” operation every Halloween. I say “haunted house” loosely because that’s not really what it is. You don’t see any ghosts or ghouls but rather a tour of “real life” situations, played by actors representing hell-bound people. At the end of the tour, guests are encouraged to repent so that they, too, do not wind up in hell like the poor unfortunate Hell House characters. Now, my own church put on a haunted house every year, too, but we had stuff like zombies crawling out of the ground, a mummy popping out of his tomb, and a man with a knife chasing us down the hall. One year I even got to play a crazy woman in the insane asylum and freaked everyone out, hehe. So the concept of using Halloween as an excuse to scare people into becoming Christian is alien to me. I think that Ratliff did an excellent job of showing the work that goes into putting the production together, exposing a couple mistakes made along the way – you guys, the Star of David and a pentagram are not the same thing – and introducing us to the people behind the Hell House, including a family man, a charming teenage girl with acting ambitions, and a kid trying to impress people with his “knowledge” of the underground rave scene. (The last one highly amused me, which I’m quite sure was not his intention). I do want to note that the first three times Eric and I tried to rent this from Netflix, each disc we received had been mysteriously sabotaged with some type of chemical. It wasn’t until we got a Wii and streamed the movie from the Netflix channel that we were able to watch the whole thing!

The Crazies: What happens when there really is “something in the water”? Well, in this remake of a 1973 Romero flick, everyone starts to turn into a homicidal maniac. The “good guys” who are lucky enough to survive are left to fight their way out of dodge – and the “crazies” aren’t always the ones they’re running from. Timothy Olyphant, who also stars in FX’s excellent modern day Western, Justified, plays the sheriff. (He was also in Scream 2!) Radha Mitchell is the town doctor/his pregnant wife.
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The Nightmare Before Christmas: A musical Tim Burton classic with amazing visuals tells the story of Jack Skellington as he tires of being the “Pumpkin King” of Halloween … and becomes infatuated with the Christmas spirit instead. A very clever way of saying “Just be yourself.” We watch this every Halloween and Christmas.
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Creepshow and Creepshow 2: Several different horror stories in each one! Creepshow director George Romero has said that Tales from the Dark Side is the unofficial “Creepshow 3” – not the actual movie of the same name – so I’m going to watch that one next.
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Halloween series: These movies are hit-or-miss. Nothing compares to the first creepy tale of Michael Myers stalking his estranged sister, but the second one makes a good attempt! Unfortunately, it’s all downhill from there. The character of Michael Myers was supposed to be retired following Halloween II; from that point on, the Halloween series would devote itself to an entirely new spooky story, separate from all the rest, with each flick released. I would’ve loved to see this idea come to full fruition, but it never did. You can thank the third movie, Season of the Witch for that, I’m sure, because it was laughably bad (and rotated around an incredibly irksome commercial jangle). So Michael Myers returned for Halloween 4 and every Halloween sequel after that brought him back over and over again to shuffle toward another set of screaming teenagers. Just kill him already!
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Tremors: I had somehow never seen this. It’s more funny than scary. Kevin Bacon, Fred Ward, and Finn Carter are part of a crew of small town residents fighting off man-eating worms that stalk them from under the ground. Look for Reba McEntire as one-half of a couple of gun enthusiasts.
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The Descent: I’ve been spelunking (caving) twice in my life, and I am SO thankful this movie came out years afterwards! A group of six women explore a North Carolina cave system in this superb British film and find themselves stalked by man-hunting creatures that live there. Excellent acting, characterization, and a well-done terror buildup. But if you are prone to nightmares, this is the last movie I would recommend you view. There is a sequel which I haven’t seen.
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WordGirl: Tricks and Treats: Looking for silly things to watch on the Wii Netflix channel while we waited for our next Netflix disc to come in, Eric and I came across this Halloween episode of a PBS Kids series called WordGirl. The series revolves around a vocabulary expert and her alter-ego, WordGirl, solving crimes; in this case, she battles evil candy-stealing robots. I was pleasantly surprised; it’s clever.
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The Blob: This 1988 remake makes a team out of an unlikely set of teenagers – a popular cheerleader and a delinquent with mostly good intentions – as they fight to defeat a giant blob that’s devouring and dissolving almost everyone. I dug it.
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The Monster Squad: A childhood favorite of Eric’s. A 12-year-old kid and his monster club fight off an invasion by Dracula, the Mummy, Frankenstein’s Monster, Wolfman, and “Gill Man” (read: the Creature from the Black Lagoon). Cute and funny 80s movie gold.
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They Live: A John Carpenter classic about a construction worker who discovers a pair of sunglasses that show him the horrifying truth about who really controls Planet Earth.
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Night of the Lepus: I am so glad that Eric told me about this hilarious 1972 film (starring Janet Leigh) about a pack of giant man-eating rabbits, breeding like crazy and terrorizing mankind! Basically, the filmmakers just found a bunch of cute rabbits, blew up their images and then filmed the actors screaming and running away as the rabbits hop after them, twitching their noses. Awwww.
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Monster Island: We rented this in part because we were hoping to get a modern day utterly cheesy giant monster movie a la the Sci-Fi Channel (oh, excuse me, SY FY Channel), and in part because Adam West (of Batman TV show fame) was in it. We should’ve known MTV wouldn’t be able to produce anything that glorious. This movie was so stupid we couldn’t even watch it all the way through. Any fan of monster movies knows that the best part about the movie is THE MONSTER. Here the giant flying insects of Monster Island get precious little screen time next to a slew of horribly bad actors with way too much dialogue. Half the point of a monster movie is to laugh at bad actors as they get eaten left and right, but that’s just not happening here. It’s not cheesy, it’s not fun, it’s just … bad.
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Ice Spiders: Speaking of SyFy movies, make sure you catch this one. Giant spiders terrorize innocent skiiers! Hehehe! Other recommended Sy Fy flicks are Mega Piranha, Sharktopus, and Mansquito. Hilarious! Now that’s how you should be doing a monster movie.
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Trick ‘r Treat: An anthology of stories that all take place on Halloween and all fit together somehow. If you wish there was a horror/Halloween-based Love Actually, you’ll probably like this. True Blood star Anna Paquin dominates one tale.
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National Geographic Kids: Creepy Creatures: Another kids’ special we came across on the Netflix channel. Clawdette the cat tells you all about some of nature’s creepiest creatures and sings a few really silly songs. Appropriate for very young children who are just learning about animals and won’t find the songs unbearable.
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National Geographic’s Is It Real?: Ghosts: I don’t know what it is with National Geo. I love their magazines, their web site, and their museum in D.C., but what’s up with their television series? Both Is It Real?, which explores ghosts, UFOs, Bigfoot, etc. and Taboo (which explores different cultural views of things like obesity and prostitution) use images and narration that are awfully redundant. Here, this episode of Is It Real? explored the belief in ghosts, but skimmed over many things that I wanted to hear more about while assaulting me with way too much flash and blur. Now it was interesting enough, but definitely not my first recommendation.
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Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead: You can’t go wrong with a classic Romero zombie film. And the remakes of both are awesome as well. (Caution: Not all Living Dead remakes are genuine Romero, as the movie’s rights are now in the public domain. The Dawn of the Dead remake shown here was directed by Zack Snyder, and to my knowledge Romero had nothing to do with it other than the fact it was adapted from his original screenplay, but it is excellent.)
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We have Rankin and Bass’s Mad Monster Party coming in the mail next! I can’t wait – after seeing numerous Rankin and Bass Christmas specials, I’ve been waiting on this one for a long time!
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What are your favorite scary things to watch, at Halloween or any time of year?

The Halloween Countdown: Halloween Candy

I purchased this darling cookie jar from the Cracker Barrel a couple of months ago:

If Sumo was a cookie jar ...

So of course we filled it with Halloween candy, like this:

GIMME CANDY

…and now I don’t want to go anywhere near a scale. I wish Eric would just devour it all. Sure it would be disappointing, but at least I wouldn’t have to wrestle with my willpower every time I pass the mummy kitty’s sweet begging expression. “Ohhh, I’m so full … won’t you help me deflate a little?” he pleads. “Come on, one little Reese’s pumpkin won’t hurt you. Ohhhh, I just feel so heavy! … What’s that? You want more? Oh, you’re so kind ma’am …”

Anyway, here’s some of the tasty candy we got. Seriously, I look forward to shopping for Halloween candy every year. It wouldn’t be a big deal to keep it in the house if I could just eat a piece or two a day! We were unable to find our perennial favorite, Monster Munny, anywhere and I’m afraid to keep looking. If we do find it, it will die an unseemly death! I still can’t forgive my last employer for insisting upon putting out a fresh bag of candy right near my desk every few days, right as I was celebrating successfully losing 40 pounds of post-college beer weight.

Look for:

Butterfinger pumpkins. These are seriously the most delicious thing going in the candy aisle. You get a smaller palm-sized milk chocolate jack-o-lantern with those buttery, crunchy bits scattered inside. Given the nature of the product, there’s far more chocolate then you’d find covering a regular Butterfinger bar. It’s soft and heavenly, and the butterfinger bits are a pleasant surprise here and there. NOM. To my great shock, these were the first to vanish out of the mummy jar.

Reese’s dark chocolate peanut butter pumpkins. These little guys are very deadly for anyone on a diet. If you don’t care, then have at it. Delicious lumps of peanut butter covered in a thin shell of dark chocolate. Now, honestly, I have a hard time differentiating between milk and dark chocolate when I’m chowing on a Reese’s. I think it’s because a) there’s so little of it and b) the peanut butter is the real prize, anyway!

Hershey’s mini-bars. Essentially just little milk chocolate or cookies ‘n’ cream (white chocolate) bars with gravestones on them, these are quick and easy to eat nonetheless. I love to dip one in my hot tea. Hershey’s also used to put out a milk chocolate ghost, but I haven’t seen him in some time.

Hershey’s seasonal kisses. Over the last few years, Hershey’s has put out a whole slew of different flavored Kisses. There’s been everything from cherry cordial to mint to eggnog flavors. For Halloween, there are at least three varieties: candy corn (ehhhhh), caramel apple (not bad, but overly sweet), and the ridiculously yummy pumpkin spice! That last one gives you a light orange colored kiss with melty, gooey, slightly spicy goodness on the inside.

If you are having difficulty finding any of these, check your local Target. And if you’re looking for a somewhat healthier option, crack open a bag of ginger snap cookies and a block of sharp cheddar cheese; put together and eat. It’s surprisingly delicious. Kudos to my friend Seth for introducing us to that idea several years ago!

What are your favorite foods to eat at Halloween?